MARS RECYCLING TECHNOLOGY

Low Carbon Behavior Change and Technology Change...........

 Welcome to our site...Welcome to our site...Welcome to our site...Welcome to our site...Welcome to our site...Welcome to our site...Welcome to our site...Welcome to our site...Welcome to our site...

RECYCLING LEGISLATION.

Recycling Legislation What are the Packaging Waste Regulations Europe? 

  • 1994 European Union Directive on Packaging and Packaging Waste 94 / 62 / EC
  • Directive 2008/98/EC sets the basic concepts and definitions related to waste management, such as definitions of waste, recycling, recovery.
  • UK, The Producer Responsibility Obligations (Packaging Waste) Regulations 2007 (as amended) 
    Zero plastics to landfill by 2020, a challenging but realistic goal
     

  • Resource efficiency means avoiding the land-filling of plastic waste 

Phasing out the land-filling of waste is one key element to becoming more resource efficient. In a move in this direction, the EU will soon be reviewing existing waste targets. Among these proposals, Plastics Europe strongly favours measures that would restrict the land filling of recyclable and high calorific waste, including plastic waste.   

  • Plastics: too valuable to end up in landfills 

A ban or phase out of the land filling of recyclable and high calorific waste will put positive pressure on national and local administrations to unleash the full potential of waste as a resource. It will act as a powerful trigger for recycling and efficient energy-from-waste since it will provide the legal certainty required for future planning and investments in the necessary infrastructure. 

  • A challenging but realistic goal 
While seven EU Member States plus Norway and Switzerland landfill less than 10% of plastics post consumer waste, eleven-member state still landfill 60%. This is a poor enforcement of existing European legislation and land filling often still being the cheapest waste management option. Member States with a landfill ban have shown that the goal is a realistic one, with countries such as Germany significantly reducing the land filling of plastic waste within 5 years.   

 

  • All plastics can have a second life – however, no “one size fits all” 

While most plastics can technically be recycled, plastics that cannot be recycled sustainably provide valuable feedstock for efficient energy-from-waste facilities to produce electricity, heat or fuel for the production of cement, lime etc. The decision as to which route to take should be based on sustainability criteria, i.e. taking not only environmental, but also economic and social aspects into account as well. 

 2. Stimulate quality recycling by extending collection

Collection and sorting of plastic waste as input for recycling operations are crucial from both a cost and quality point of view. To maximise the availability of the material, collection schemes should be extended to more plastic waste streams and should be harmonised as much as possible at EU level.

Efficient energy recovery is needed and should not be limited

Plastic waste which cannot be sustainably recycled should be used in efficient energy from waste facilities, Energy recovery from these plastics expand the diversity of EU’s energy supply and improve the EU’s energy supply and improves energy security, as well as complements ongoing recycling efforts and helps mitigate climate change while reducing the consumption of virgin fossil fuel. It should be a growing part of the EU’s energy and resource efficiency strategy. 

Key   recommendations: 

1. Stop the   land-filling of recyclable and high calorific waste by 2020 
The 2020 goal will prevent an estimated 9.6 million tonnes of plastic waste from going to landfill every year, an amount representing just under € 9 billion. The EU and its Member States are urged to take the necessary steps to eliminate landfills, e.g. via a landfill ban or accelerating landfill taxes for   recyclable and high calorific waste. The revision of the Landfill Directive   will give the EU the opportunity to introduce such restrictions. 

2. Stimulate quality recycling by extending collection Collection and sorting of plastic waste as input for recycling operations are crucial from both a cost and quality point of view. To maximise the availability of the material, collection schemes should be extended to more plastic waste streams and should be harmonised as much as possible at EU level. Efficient energy recovery is needed and should not be limited Plastic waste which cannot be sustainably recycled should be used in efficient energy from waste facilities, Energy recovery from these plastics expand the diversity of EU’s energy supply and improve the EU’s energy supply and improves energy security, as well as complements ongoing recycling efforts and helps mitigate climate change while reducing the consumption of virgin fossil fuel. It should be a growing part of the EU’s energy and resource efficiency strategy.